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Cathleen D. Staford, LMFT

 

810 Healdsburg Avenue
Healdsburg, CA 95448

 

Cathleen D. Stafford, LMFT

Marriage & Family Therapist
California License No. LMFT37242

810 Healdsburg Avenue
Healdsburg, CA 95448

 

 

 

 

View the article on me in WOMEN IN BUSINESS

 

My areas of expertise are:

•  Life Coaching
•  Behavioral Issues
•  Individual, Couples, and Family Therapy

Parenting teenagers is a challenging job! You certainly do not have to walk that road alone. Counseling can help you and your entire family.

Cathleen works with boys and girls ages 12 and up. She helps her clients learn to manage anxiety, depression and family conflict while improving their self-esteem. Cathleen also works with parents of teens, coaching them to parent from the heart and build healthy family relationships.

Cathleen uses a combination of therapeutic approaches to help her clients make progress on their goals and create the life they truly want. She would love to help you and or your family. Call today for a free consultation!

Located in Healdsburg, CA in beautiful Sonoma County, Cathleen recently opened her office after being displaced by the Tubbs fire. Please email or call with questions or to make an appointment at 707-473-8427, then visit her office located at 810 Healdsburg Avenue, Healdsburg, CA 95448.

I can work with you on the following issues:

  • ADHD
  • Addiction
  • Alcohol Abuse
  • Anger Management
  • Anxiety
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Career Counseling
  • Child or Adolescent
  • Chronic Impulsivity
  • Codependency
  • Coping Skills
  • Depression
  • Divorce
  • Grief
  • Infidelity
  • Life Coach
  • Life Transitions
  • Marital and Premarital
  • Oppositional Defiance
  • Parenting
  • Peer Relationships
  • Pregnancy, Prenatal, Postpartum
  • Relationship Issues
  • School Issues
  • Self Esteem
  • Self-Harming
  • Sports Performance
  • Stress
  • Trauma and PTSD
  • Women’s Issues
Family Systems

Family Systems therapists view problems within the family as the result not of particular members’ behaviors, but of the family’s group dynamic. The family is seen as a complex system having its own language, roles, rules, beliefs, needs and patterns. The therapist helps each individual member understand how their childhood family operated, their role in that system, and how that experience has shaped their role in the current family. Therapists with the MFT credential are usually trained in Family Systems therapy.

Coaching

Life coaching is an increasingly popular profession that has no specific licensing or academic requirements. Though psychologists also often consider themselves life coaches, these therapists don’t focus on treating mental illness. Instead, they help individuals realize their goals in work and in life. An executive coach, for example, may be enlisted to help a chief executive become a better manager, while a “love” coach may map out a plan to help a client find romantic fulfillment.

Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

Cognitive-behavioral therapy stresses the role of thinking in how we feel and what we do. It is based on the belief that thoughts, rather than people or events, cause our negative feelings. The therapist assists the client in identifying, testing the reality of, and correcting dysfunctional beliefs underlying his or her thinking. The therapist then helps the client modify those thoughts and the behaviors that flow from them. CBT is a structured collaboration between therapist and client and often calls for homework assignments. CBT has been clinically proven to help clients in a relatively short amount of time with a wide range of disorders, including depression and anxiety.

Culturally Sensitive

Culturally sensitive therapists provide therapy that is culturally sensitive. They understand that people from different backgrounds have different values, practices, and beliefs, and are sensitive to those differences when working with individuals and families in therapy.

Family / Marital

Family and Marital therapists work with families or couples both together and individually to help them improve their communication skills, build on the positive aspects of their relationships, and repair the harmful or negative aspects.

Narrative

Narrative Therapy uses the client’s storytelling to indicate the way they construct meaning in their lives, rather than focusing on how they communicate their problem behaviors. Narrative Therapy embraces the idea that stories actually shape our behaviors and our lives and that we become the stories we tell about ourselves. There are helpful narratives we can choose to embrace as well as unhelpful ones. Although it may sound obvious, the power of storytelling is to elevate the client–who is the authority of their narrative–rather than the therapist, as expert.

Person-Centered

Person-centered therapy uses a non-authoritative approach that allows clients to take more of a lead in discussions so that, in the process, they will discover their own solutions. The therapist acts as a compassionate facilitator, listening without judgment and acknowledging the client’s experience without moving the conversation in another direction. The therapist is there to encourage and support the client and to guide the therapeutic process without interrupting or interfering with the client’s process of self-discovery.

Solution Focused Brief (SFBT)

Solution-focused therapy, sometimes called “brief therapy,” focuses on what clients would like to achieve through therapy rather than on their troubles or mental health issues. The therapist will help the client envision a desirable future, and then map out the small and large changes necessary for the client to undergo to realize their vision. The therapist will seize on any successes the client experiences, to encourage them to build on their strengths rather than dwell on their problems or limitations.

 

My areas of expertise are:

  • Life Coaching
  • Behavioral Issues
  • Individual, Couples, and Family Therapy

Parenting teenagers is a challenging job! You certainly do not have to walk that road alone. Counseling can help you and your entire family.

Cathleen works with boys and girls ages 12 and up. She helps her clients learn to manage anxiety, depression and family conflict while improving their self-esteem. Cathleen also works with parents of teens, coaching them to parent from the heart and build healthy family relationships.

Cathleen uses a combination of therapeutic approaches to help her clients make progress on their goals and create the life they truly want. She would love to help you and or your family. Call today for a free consultation!

Located in Healdsburg, CA in beautiful Sonoma County, Cathleen recently opened her office after being displaced by the Tubbs fire. Please email or call with questions or to make an appointment at 707-473-8427, then visit her office located at 810 Healdsburg Avenue, Healdsburg, CA 95448.

 

I can work with you on the following issues:

  • ADHD
  • Addiction
  • Alcohol Abuse
  • Anger Management
  • Anxiety
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Career Counseling
  • Child or Adolescent
  • Chronic Impulsivity
  • Codependency
  • Coping Skills
  • Depression
  • Divorce
  • Grief
  • Infidelity
  • Life Coach
  • Life Transitions
  • Marital and Premarital
  • Oppositional Defiance
  • Parenting
  • Peer Relationships
  • Pregnancy, Prenatal, Postpartum
  • Relationship Issues
  • School Issues
  • Self Esteem
  • Self-Harming
  • Sports Performance
  • Stress
  • Trauma and PTSD
  • Women’s Issues
Family Systems

Family Systems therapists view problems within the family as the result not of particular members’ behaviors, but of the family’s group dynamic. The family is seen as a complex system having its own language, roles, rules, beliefs, needs and patterns. The therapist helps each individual member understand how their childhood family operated, their role in that system, and how that experience has shaped their role in the current family. Therapists with the MFT credential are usually trained in Family Systems therapy.

Coaching

Life coaching is an increasingly popular profession that has no specific licensing or academic requirements. Though psychologists also often consider themselves life coaches, these therapists don’t focus on treating mental illness. Instead, they help individuals realize their goals in work and in life. An executive coach, for example, may be enlisted to help a chief executive become a better manager, while a “love” coach may map out a plan to help a client find romantic fulfillment.

Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

Cognitive-behavioral therapy stresses the role of thinking in how we feel and what we do. It is based on the belief that thoughts, rather than people or events, cause our negative feelings. The therapist assists the client in identifying, testing the reality of, and correcting dysfunctional beliefs underlying his or her thinking. The therapist then helps the client modify those thoughts and the behaviors that flow from them. CBT is a structured collaboration between therapist and client and often calls for homework assignments. CBT has been clinically proven to help clients in a relatively short amount of time with a wide range of disorders, including depression and anxiety.

Culturally Sensitive

Culturally sensitive therapists provide therapy that is culturally sensitive. They understand that people from different backgrounds have different values, practices, and beliefs, and are sensitive to those differences when working with individuals and families in therapy.

Family / Marital

Family and Marital therapists work with families or couples both together and individually to help them improve their communication skills, build on the positive aspects of their relationships, and repair the harmful or negative aspects.

Narrative

Narrative Therapy uses the client’s storytelling to indicate the way they construct meaning in their lives, rather than focusing on how they communicate their problem behaviors. Narrative Therapy embraces the idea that stories actually shape our behaviors and our lives and that we become the stories we tell about ourselves. There are helpful narratives we can choose to embrace as well as unhelpful ones. Although it may sound obvious, the power of storytelling is to elevate the client–who is the authority of their narrative–rather than the therapist, as expert.

Person-Centered

Person-centered therapy uses a non-authoritative approach that allows clients to take more of a lead in discussions so that, in the process, they will discover their own solutions. The therapist acts as a compassionate facilitator, listening without judgment and acknowledging the client’s experience without moving the conversation in another direction. The therapist is there to encourage and support the client and to guide the therapeutic process without interrupting or interfering with the client’s process of self-discovery.

Solution Focused Brief (SFBT)

Solution-focused therapy, sometimes called “brief therapy,” focuses on what clients would like to achieve through therapy rather than on their troubles or mental health issues. The therapist will help the client envision a desirable future, and then map out the small and large changes necessary for the client to undergo to realize their vision. The therapist will seize on any successes the client experiences, to encourage them to build on their strengths rather than dwell on their problems or limitations.